How to express politely in English – 2nd part

How to express politely in English – 2nd part

Training centre Raya London would be delighted if it could help its students and friends better fit into English reality and culture. At first glance, manners seem to lose their meaning. But do not be fooled – upbringing will always be a currency of high value, and the polite person can communicate freely, without looking stiff or hypocritical. Especially English manners have very deep roots in the past and it is good to stick to this system of expression. This will always pay us back and be appreciated by our interlocutors.

So, let’s start with the simple saying “Please give me …”. It’s simpler to say “Give me the salt!”, But even if we add “please,” another effect will be achieved with “Can you pass me the salt, please?”. More traditional is better! More polite – double better!

The word “Mr.” (Mister) has not yet expired. It is, however, used when we know the family of the person to whom we turn. This may be, for example, someone older than us or our friend’s father. In this case, we refer to “Mr. Brown, “for example. But if our name is unknown, it is enough to say “Sir”.

Little different things are with Mrs. (Missis, or as you can see in the literature – Missus). This is an address to a married woman. We are not always sure whether we are talking to one. At the same time, many women today do not marry and do not change their siblings with a partner. It seems as if the “Ms.” (Miss) is more appropriate today.

Speaking by phone also has its own specificity. If we are called and are looking for another person from our environment or if we cannot speak right away, we can easily say “Wait!”. But we’d better say “Can you hold, please?” Or “Can you keep it, please?”). Thus the ordained address passes into a polite prayer for patience. In any case, it will be better understood.

We are in a situation where we want something that we cannot or do not want to do. We should not just cut off “No!”. Too categorical to the English way of respectful expression! It’s much better to say “I’m Afraid I Can’t.” (I’m afraid I could not).

Business is also good to know some rules. For example, do not put negative expressions in your speech. To say directly “This is a bad idea!” Is unacceptable. Much better would be the phrase “I do not think that’s such a good idea!”. Yes, it is definitely grammatically more complicated, but it shows positivity that goes hand in hand with the upbringing and good attitude towards the interlocutor, which is a must.

Various examples we might still be applicable in favor of the thesis that the polite and mannered speech is profitable. The English language, by its very nature, gives many opportunities for such expression. And it comes not only from the relationship of the aristocracy and of behavior characteristic of the lower classes of society in the past. For us, the Bulgarians, such manners may sound exaggerated. But, we assure you, in English this is quite right.

We will be happy if you contact Training Center “Raya” London with any questions you care about the English language and English grammar. Suggest us the next topics on our blog!

 

Written by : Iveta Radeva

Training Centre Raya London
Training Centre Raya London
Training Centre Raya London is a new and fastly developing English Language School specialized in teaching English as a second language. Founded in 2015 we are small enough to provide a personal service, but large enough to have very good facilities and resources for the students to learn English in UK.